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Insik Sate
PROMOTIONLESS SHAME

Play track  1. Insik Sate · depart
Play track  2. Insik Sate · antic
Play track  3. Insik Sate · i thee am
Play track  4. Insik Sate · varying degrees of pressure
Play track  5. Insik Sate · new york city land
Play track  6. Insik Sate · taste
Play track  7. Insik Sate · Konitz
Play track  8. Insik Sate · ephemera
Play track  9. Insik Sate · the rain wrote this

Insik Sate – PROMOTIONLESS SHAME

wpid-insik-sate-promotionless-shame-medium.jpginsik sate (pronounced “in six eight”)
PROMOTIONLESS SHAME

This being my first release, my aim with this record is to do something slightly different in electronic music. This is indeed a bold statement considering this genre is built firmly on a foundation of avant garde experimentation. Ironically, my approach is to compose my music using somewhat traditional methods. I try to incorporate music theory from classical music, hungarian folk, and modern jazz, because those are the roots of my formal music education. Whenever possible I employ polyrhythm, chordal dissonance, and odd time signatures frequently to create a sense of depth.

My ultimate intention is to create a balance between what is designed to be intentionally artificial, and what is intrinsically human. I use both synthesis and acoustic instrumentation; some parts are played live, some are computer programmed. In the same song, I’ll use both warm sounding pads, and nasty digitally clipped beats. No matter what, there is always humanity and artificiality, blended together.

Man and machine.

“Promotionless Shame itself is an interesting record. Insik Sate, electronically, is not all that different from many of the genre’s largest artists. There are hints of DJ Shadow here or a dash of Aphex Twin there yet, somehow, Shame doesn’t really come off as a rip-off. Each song sounds different, feels can range from that of Depart, a mix of haunting pads and almost obnoxiously loud computer generated drums to that of Antic, a mellow blend of chilled out electric piano chords and a subtle, fast-paced blend of obviously synthesized percussion. And that’s just in the album’s opening quarter.” – The Katz Brothers @ sputnikmusic [ click here for the full review ]

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